Thoughts regarding sports and mentoring.
Caution: Severe Tennessee Titan, Memphis Grizzlies, Chicago Cubs, and Scott Stallings bias.

Aaron

July 30th, 2015 | Comments Off on Aaron

I will always remember the first time I met Aaron.

Aaron Catholic

It was the second week of an already promising season. And although his team was off to a rough start at 0-1 with another difficult opponent looming, they were still the prohibitive favorites to win another state title.

Winning is something that comes easy to Aaron, his charisma and intelligence are matched only by his ability to turn seemingly impossible plays into effortless displays of athleticism on the field.

Today was different. Today Aaron was going to lose.

Milling about practices is a regular activity as a mentor with The Lead Block, supporting a current player or discovering a student in search of their destiny.

Looking

Murmurs from the players and coaches are what I noticed first, then the reason came into view. A school administrator, still adorned in suit and tie, walked purposefully and solemnly towards the head coach.

The whispered gossip was enough to piece together that Aaron was in trouble.

After a quick exchange between administrator and coach, Aaron was motioned to join the impromptu meeting. A simple September practice faded to silence.

With a labored nod, Aaron turned and trotted towards the locker room.

His season was over.

The entire team had just witnessed Aaron’s expulsion from school.

A few weeks later, Aaron and I met briefly for lunch to discuss his future. And he agreed that mentoring was something he would be interested in trying out.

34 mentoring appointments, 8 tutoring sessions, a raised ACT score, and college scholarship offer later, Aaron changed his destiny.

Aaron told me over lunch today (the day I wrote this post) that he did not know what to think of a complete stranger calling him up, offering to meet for lunch, and talk about his future. He was not looking for a mentor.

But, we were looking for him.

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Partner with us (CLICK HERE) so The Lead Block can find 5 more Aarons on fields, courts, and in classrooms all over Knoxville.

By the way, Aaron did end up returning to play his senior year and led his team to what would ultimately be the first of three consecutive state titles.  That May, he graduated high school on-time and is currently working towards finishing his Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management from the University of Tennessee.

Aaron plans to start his own business later this year, purchasing homes in Knoxville, fixing them up, and renting them out to families that need affordable housing.

“Those breakfast talks are the best foundation I could have right now.” – Aaron

Remember, it is Aaron that deserves all the credit.  Because at The Lead Block, we will always be about the players scoring their destiny.

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Just Admit It

January 9th, 2012 | 1 comment

Our response to Tim Tebow’s season reveals the character of us all.

We have all been wrong.

I thought The Matrix was going to be a bad movie.

I thought the iPhone was too expensive for a phone.

I thought shrimp was a slimy and undesirable appetizer.

And I thought all of Tim Tebow’s critics had an axe to grind.

I was wrong.

His critics (who include former NFL quarterbacks, scouts, and current general managers) have legitimate concerns about his potential and future in the NFL.

Tim Tebow is not an elite NFL passer-sometimes missing open receivers, sometimes too slowly looking over his progressions, or occasionally winding up a little too long to throw downfield. He is not the next Tom Brady, Aaron Rodgers, or Drew Brees.

I admit it.

For comparison, here are two quarterbacks’ regular season statistics:

courtesy of www.pro-football-reference.com

Each young passer led their team to the playoffs. Each quarterback was supported by a solid defense. Each quarterback did more damage on the ground than in the air.

The 24-year old quarterback is Tim Tebow, this year.

The 26-year old is former NFL MVP Steve McNair, who led his 1999 Titan team to a Super Bowl appearance with the help of a far more miraculous game-winning play.

Both won their first playoff games in an unconventional way.

So, in the face of one of the more memorable Denver playoff victories against a favored Pittsburgh team, how will those same critics respond the day after?

NFL gurus and fans alike that doubted or touted Tebow have to admit it. Even if this is his only season as the starting quarterback for the Denver Broncos, it is a season worth remembering. A humbling contrition that both sides can admit after Sunday.

Faced with the same criticism and fandemonium, Tim chose humility. Why can’t we?

Humility is a difficult, but powerful, demonstration of character.

For this reason, The Lead Block challenges its players to play with humility on the field and live in humility off it. To find out how to become a part and click ABOUT.

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